New Ultrasonic Cleaner

Gepetto

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
10,191
Location
Sterling, MA
Tagline
Old 'Arn Enthusiast
#22
He also is putting in way too much sodium carbonate. You don't even need a cupful for a tank that size.
 

WOPL Sniffer

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Aug 10, 2015
Messages
7,270
Location
Minnie-Soda
Tagline
Screw it
#25
I just tried to clean some PCB's and I guess I need to find a solution to assist in getting the flux off. Just water and a half teaspoon of Dawn may have worked for the greasy and dirty 100 year old sewing machine parts but it didn't get the boards quite clean enough. Back in the day, like everybody else, we used things that were not only toxic for the body, they were toxic for the environment. The Navy had us use a substance in our ultrasonic machines which worked SO WELL, we should have known it was not good for body or earth... This is what we used.....

Trichlorotrifluoroethane is a clear, colorless liquid with an ether-like odor. It was banned from use as a chlorofluorocarbon for its ozone-layer destroying properties. Trichlorotrifluoroethane was primarily used as a dry cleaning solvent. It was also used as a refrigerant.


Obviously I don't wan't to use anything like that but it took the old flux right off. I see some ho-made solutions but I don't like some of the ingredients so I will keep looking. Some of the "stuff" they are using are expensive so time for some research.
 

J!m

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Messages
2,669
Location
Connecticut
#26
‘Sniff, if you have a junk board, try a wash with Brakleen. In the red can, not the green can.

That’s a chlorinated solvent. May attack some plastic but safe for rubber and destroys grease n stuff.

More expensive option is also Trichlorethane (no florine) sold to watchmakers as “one dip”. That works awesome.
 

bill7621

Journeyman
Joined
Jan 31, 2016
Messages
487
Location
Berlin Center, Ohio
Tagline
WTF, y'all
#28
Trichlorethane is a known carcinogen that causes upper respiratory failure. Look it up. We used to use it at work. You're right, it is an excellent cleaner. Used to get it in 55 gallon cans and used it to clean the radiators on our transformers at power plants. Then when we found out what it caused it was disposed of by the hazmat people. I think its use has been banned since the mid 90's due to the human risks and it also contributes to ozone depletion.
 

WOPL Sniffer

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Aug 10, 2015
Messages
7,270
Location
Minnie-Soda
Tagline
Screw it
#29
‘Sniff, if you have a junk board, try a wash with Brakleen. In the red can, not the green can.

That’s a chlorinated solvent. May attack some plastic but safe for rubber and destroys grease n stuff.

More expensive option is also Trichlorethane (no florine) sold to watchmakers as “one dip”. That works awesome.

Did you NOT read that the Ultasonic Cleaner holds 30 Liters???? I have a method of cleaning with CHEMICALS and I'm trying to get away from them...... Why replace one chemical with another? I'm looking at biodegradable options NOT rot my liver options..... My liver damage will be from other things and not brakleen.
 

Gepetto

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
10,191
Location
Sterling, MA
Tagline
Old 'Arn Enthusiast
#36
Flextronics was using this for quite a while, maybe still are. No clean fluxes have taken over most of the industry so fewer assembly houses clean boards any more.
 

J!m

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Messages
2,669
Location
Connecticut
#39
CLR would probably work but it’s a dilute acid so you’d want to neutralize it. Baking soda solution followed by distilled water rinse. Get the water to 140F and it’ll flash dry.

Again: test on junk board.

Tree hugger approved.

I’ve soaked antique drum hardware overnight in full strength stuff and then rinsed with water; followed by brasso on the shiny stuff and then sealed with carnauba wax. Once and for all. Stuff I did ten years ago still looks great.

Otherwise I think you’ll have to break down and buy the overpriced ultrasonic solution made for the task. But at least it’s not watch oil: $35.00 for two ounces...
 
Top