Bicycle audio

orange

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,704
Tagline
Broken beyond repair but highly affable
#2
Where are the turntables, LP or CD?
 

laatsch55

Administrator,
Staff member
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
64,128
Location
Gillette, Wyo.
Tagline
Halfbiass...Electron Herder and Backass Woof
#5
5 blocks down a New York city street and that boy would be wondering where his stuff went.
 

CASSETTE DECK

Chief Journeyman
Joined
Jun 20, 2013
Messages
696
Location
Kapiti Coast, New Zealand
Tagline
Path under Coastlands overbridge
#9
When I decide to install a stereo system on my bicycle, power supply won't be an issue because I already have a 12 volt electrical system set up on my pushbike consisting of a 12 volt rechargeable battery, alternator and switchmode charge regulator with 22 volt to 50 volt DC external input. This currently runs the front white LED floodlight and flashing red LED tail light.

I could use either a car stereo and speakers mounted on brackets or a boombox mounted on a bracket, connected to the 12 volt bicycle electrical system via external DC input socket.

http://forums.phxaudiotape.com/show...g-Buck-Voltage-Converter-for-Battery-Charging
 
Last edited:

orange

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,704
Tagline
Broken beyond repair but highly affable
#10
I'm just aiming for a simple 80s Pioneer Supertuner II analog tuner with cassette and two 4" speakers in my Hondaline fairing for the Rollfast, with halogen (MD-11?) healamp and LED taillight and full turn signals/markers off a 12V lead acid battery for an emergency exit sign or kiddie car type vehicle, which I'll charge each day. Also a Harley type replica horn inside the fairing.

Some pointers from you would be nice, C. J.
 

orange

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,704
Tagline
Broken beyond repair but highly affable
#13
I'd be careful where you place your twist shifter, it might not Shpongle well later.
 

orange

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,704
Tagline
Broken beyond repair but highly affable
#15
I never had to shift much, it would become an automatic transmission shortly anyhow and I could inadvertently break 'aircraft-strength' brake cables without trying.

I've stuck with single speeds most of my life.
 

Lazarus Short

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Mar 10, 2012
Messages
9,175
Location
Independence, MO
Tagline
I'm the Red Knight, by grant of the Black
#16
I never had to shift much, it would become an automatic transmission shortly anyhow and I could inadvertently break 'aircraft-strength' brake cables without trying.

I've stuck with single speeds most of my life.
There's a lot to be said for single-speeds, and the current "fixie" fad underlines it. If nothing else, the chains are stronger, and the backpedal braking will NEVER throw you over the handlebars - been there and done that. Myself, I gave up pedal clips & straps, clipless pedals, and skinny tires. In fact, I had a pair of wheels custom built for me many years ago for my road bike, and the rims were chosen to take the fattest tires which would fit in my road frame. The clearances are so tight, that to remove the rear wheel requires deflating the tire. One bike shop mechanic mistook them for mountain bike wheels, so in a way, I may have invented the 29'er wheel...
 

orange

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,704
Tagline
Broken beyond repair but highly affable
#17
I don't like fixies...they tend to do it go get rid of BRAKES as well as shifting and then they butcher Panasonics, Peugeots and even DeRosas and Bianchis, which are excellent bikes and it disgusts me as to the level of ignorance that goes into ruining a bike that would otherwise sell for decent money. When you convert one of these bikes there's no going back...you remove the parts that would hang the derailleur etc and then the bike is lost as a touring bike ever again.

It doesn't make sense and the new aluminum frames are so light that there's no reason for it.
 

Lazarus Short

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Mar 10, 2012
Messages
9,175
Location
Independence, MO
Tagline
I'm the Red Knight, by grant of the Black
#18
I don't like fixies...they tend to do it go get rid of BRAKES as well as shifting and then they butcher Panasonics, Peugeots and even DeRosas and Bianchis, which are excellent bikes and it disgusts me as to the level of ignorance that goes into ruining a bike that would otherwise sell for decent money. When you convert one of these bikes there's no going back...you remove the parts that would hang the derailleur etc and then the bike is lost as a touring bike ever again.

It doesn't make sense and the new aluminum frames are so light that there's no reason for it.
I agree with you - one of the first fixies I saw was set up with a downtube shift lever to actuate the front brake. I thought it was a prelude to a massive fail. I did a few mods to my PX-10 frame, but it still functions as a touring bike, and still has 15 speeds. Well, it did, as I stripped it to the frame for the move from New Mexico, and plan to transfer all the high-grade components to a Peugeot mixtie I gave to my daughter, but which is too big for her. A mixtie has more lateral stiffness than a normal road frame, giving good pedaling efficiency, but also less vertical stiffness than a normal road frame, yielding a more comfortable ride.
 

Nick Danger

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Apr 28, 2013
Messages
2,777
#19
That's an interesting place to put your twist-shifter - I've never seen it done like that. Your idea?
Just wanted to keep my handlebars a little less cluttered, Laz. I like to think of it as my "suicide shifter". The idea came from having entirely too much free time while I was building my current velo. I had seen shifter mounted under seats and on frames in the past, but couldn't remember seeing one mounted on a stem.
 

orange

Veteran and General Yakker
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,704
Tagline
Broken beyond repair but highly affable
#20
I agree with you - one of the first fixies I saw was set up with a downtube shift lever to actuate the front brake. I thought it was a prelude to a massive fail. I did a few mods to my PX-10 frame, but it still functions as a touring bike, and still has 15 speeds. Well, it did, as I stripped it to the frame for the move from New Mexico, and plan to transfer all the high-grade components to a Peugeot mixtie I gave to my daughter, but which is too big for her. A mixtie has more lateral stiffness than a normal road frame, giving good pedaling efficiency, but also less vertical stiffness than a normal road frame, yielding a more comfortable ride.
I'm familiar with mixtes, I got an 80s Univega at a thrift store for a quarter to save it from a dumpster and paid it forward to another Bike Forums member

(I'm Rollfast)
 
Top