Anyone here ever seen one of these??

roccus

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#1
Anyone seen one of these???

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Seeburg-Lib...177436?hash=item1a16d48a1c:g:4AwAAOSwmtJXWdE3

It's a Seeburg LU-1 library unit. They hold 100 45rpm records each record has a lever below its slot with 4 positions to play both side of record, just side A only, just side B only, or skip the record. If all levers are set to play both sides of the records you get 200 songs or more if you load them up with LP 45's. They have a tube preamp in them. They were made in the early to late 50's and were used in office building, supermarkets, and other stores for back ground music they were plugged into the PA system. They are pretty cool units I bought sold and restored several of them along with full sized jukes. Elvis had one of these in his home he had loaded up with all his hits there is a pic somewhere around the net you can see it behind him in the background.

This one is mine I still have...

 

orange

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#2
I knew those linear CD changers had to have had a predecessor. Wicked cool.
 

roccus

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#5
how the 45rpm came to br

Not sure how many of you know or have thought how the 45 RPM record came to be it all has to do with jukeboxs.... You all know of the 78 RPM record that was developed by Columbia and was the standard for records for many years. The thing about them was in commercial use they were pig heavy and did not have a long life before they would start to break down and sound quality would suffer a lot in part do to the heavy weight needed on the stylus for the 78 format. Columbia had developed the 33 1/3 record at the end of the 40's but it just never caught on.

RCA decided to try to change that and go head to head with Columbia and decided to come out with a new format, a smaller more compact record. So how did RCA decide on 45 RPM?? Think about it subtract 33 from 78.... The war was on RCA's 45 vs. Columbias 78 just like the VHS vs BETA war we all saw. RCA knew to get their format out their for commercial use they had to convince one of the big jukebox manufacturers to get on board. Seeburg decided to go with it. Thy produced the first 45 RPM juke in 1950 the model B. at the time most 78 jukes only held 20 records for a total of 40 selections but the Seeburg model B was made to hold 50 45 RPM records for a total 100 selections. Vendors embraced this new format they loved it the bigger the selection the more money a machine could pull in.

The Seeburg model B was a huge over night successes so much so that other juke manufacturers had to jump on board with this new format and start building 100 selection 45 RPM jukes as well. Problem was vendors had a lot of money tied up in 78 RPM jukes and could not just trash all the 78 machines to go 45. The answer to that again came from Seeburg who developed conversion kits for their 78 juke to be able to play 45's. Other manufacturers followed suit and also made conversion kits. This was all it took now vendors were able to slowly replace their old 78 machines for 45 machines. RCA won the war the 45 become the standard for commercial use and lasted up through the next war... the CD.
 

orange

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#6
Ah, but Columbia/CBS did have STEREO 7" 33 rpm jukebox records and not only were there jukeboxes that played them (for there were no mono version so these were trade discs) but to this day 7 inch 'singles' and EPs from Britain and other countries use the 33 rpm speed or small spindle hole.

I just recently picked up the 1980 one-sided 7" of Paul McCartney's Coming Up (Live in Glasgow) that was a major hit in North America, the 'conventional' 45 rpm 7" having both the LP version as an A side and the live version and Lunchbox/Odd Sox as a B side.

I have that too, somewhere.

God, I really miss Casey Kasem. The dude was like your best pal at a record shop.
 
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Northwinds

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#7
I have some of those 33 rpm 7"ers somewhere. You should see the small pile of 7" records I am getting ready to sell LOL

If you click on properties of each image and copy/paste the url to another browser, they open huge (you might have to click on them in the next browser to open them fullsize. Some good shit



 
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orange

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#8
Send me a PM and I will work on those with you.
 

roccus

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#9
Yes they did in the 60's the 33 1/3 lp's came out they allowed longer versions of songs and multi track on one side. The Seeburg addressed the dual use of either 45 or 33 buy adapting the clamp arm that clamps the the record to the turn table... the 33 1/3 has the usual small spindle hole while the 45 the large hole there were a set of points on the clamp arm if the clamp arm did not go so far in as would be the case on a 33 record the motor voltage would remain to run the motor for 33 rpm if the clamp moved in a little further the point wold open up on the clamp arm and change the voltage to the motor to speed if up to 44 rpm. Other manufacturers handled it in different was... Seeburg made a back ground music unit in the 60's thar replaced the library unit LU-1 that played LP records for back ground music that spun at 33 1/3 Seeburg offer record libraries of all genres for it as well as holiday music packages.. can you say elevator music??? lol

This is a 1000 back ground player
http://www.ebay.com/itm/SEEBURG-BMC...954094?hash=item4d47e94e6e:g:cUIAAOSwyKxXhaoK

This is an example of the records made to play in them.. not the large hole even though the were 33 1/3
http://www.ebay.com/itm/SEEBURG-100...171332?hash=item211316a2c4:g:vAEAAOSwmtJXXtn9

Ah, but Columbia/CBS did have STEREO 7" 33 rpm jukebox records and not only were there jukeboxes that played them (for there were no mono version so these were trade discs) but to this day 7 inch 'singles' and EPs from Britain and other countries use the 33 rpm speed or small spindle hole.

I just recently picked up the 1980 one-sided 7" of Paul McCartney's Coming Up (Live in Glasgow) that was a major hit in North America, the 'conventional' 45 rpm 7" having both the LP version as an A side and the live version and Lunchbox/Odd Sox as a B side.

I have that too, somewhere.

God, I really miss Casey Kasem. The dude was like your best pal at a record shop.
 

MarkWComer

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#10
Seeburg made a back ground music unit in the 60's thar replaced the library unit LU-1 that played LP records for back ground music that spun at 33 1/3 Seeburg offer record libraries of all genres for it as well as holiday music packages.. can you say elevator music??? lol
The Seeburg Encore system was 16 2/3 RPM. I have some of those records, and they sound surprisingly good for such a slow speed:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MBhYzCpo6NA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

(The video was more about the 16 2/3 RPM speed than about the Encore system)

EDIT: HA! the embed didn't seem to work. URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBhYzCpo6NA
 

roccus

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#11
yea forgot about those seeburg also made a home 33 1/3 lp player HSC1 would hold 50 LP's the early one had a phone type dialer to make your selections then they came out with a push button selector could get them either in just bare selector in a cab to hook to an amp or full blown full size console with speakers and am/fm radio they were a nightmare to work on.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SL82cQwvyD0

The Seeburg Encore system was 16 2/3 RPM. I have some of those records, and they sound surprisingly good for such a slow speed:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MBhYzCpo6NA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

(The video was more about the 16 2/3 RPM speed than about the Encore system)

EDIT: HA! the embed didn't seem to work. URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBhYzCpo6NA
 
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